Heading Back to the UK! – April 2018

One year ago, it seemed high time to get serious about this quest. And I did.

Publishing my research seemed the best way to provide the accountability to ensure I got the history right. And, since some things can only be done (or understood) in person, I decided I had to make a trip to London and Jersey a priority.  That trip (last May) was not only fascinating and rewarding, it threw gasoline on the fire of this project. And in the year since?  Somehow it seems in the nature of research that answering one question raises several new ones, so a year later my list of “in person” tasks is now even longer and more pressing than last year’s.

My bucket list of other travel destinations will have to wait for some other year.  The UK is calling, and I must go!

Continue reading “Heading Back to the UK! – April 2018”

Jean Chevalier’s Diary – An Amazing (and largely unknown) Historical Document!

Have you ever spent a moment thinking about the word “journalist”? Because of modern media, we think of a journalist as someone who reports on news for the public media.  But in mid 1600s, a local Jersey man named Jean Chevalier was a journalist in the most basic sense of the word – he began a diary, capturing events in Jersey during the Period of the English revolution – starting in 1643 and continuing until parliamentary forces finally captured the island in 1651.  What is so remarkable about this journal is the level of penetrating detail it captured about people and events on the island – providing singular and often quite personal insights into day-to-day and historically significant events alike.  I’ve never seen anything like it…

Continue reading “Jean Chevalier’s Diary – An Amazing (and largely unknown) Historical Document!”

Maximillian Norreys: argumentum, quod vita est, quod fit, dum nos faciens ad alia factus consilia!

So I have an assignment for you – do a google search on “latin translation” and plug the title of this article into it. Everyone should know about this amazing tool the good folks at Google have brought into our world!  And make no mistake – after the curse of  targeted advertising, they owed us one!

Continue reading “Maximillian Norreys: argumentum, quod vita est, quod fit, dum nos faciens ad alia factus consilia!”

Summary Report of Jersey Visit (Part I)

I have found no evidence that Richard Lane visited Jersey before he arrived there with Charles II and his “entourage in exile” on September 17, 1649.  Richard Lane could not have been part of Charles II’s entourage during his first visit to Jersey from April 17, 1646 – June 24, 1646.  At the time of that earlier visit, Charles I was still alive, and Richard Lane was in Oxford, negotiating with parliamentary forces for the surrender of the King’s forces there. Continue reading “Summary Report of Jersey Visit (Part I)”

The Funeral Procession of Lord Keeper Lane, May 1650

In a strange and completely unplanned coincidence, I leave for my trip to London and Jersey on the 367th anniversary of Lord Lane’s death in Jersey….

 Lord Keeper Lane’s whereabouts following his negotiations for the surrender of King Charles I’s forces at Oxford in the Spring of 1646 are unclear.  But, Lord Keeper Lane could not have been part of the entourage of Charles II when he first he arrived in Jersey for a two month stay in April 1646 – at that time, Lord Keeper Lane was still in Oxford.  Whether he returned to Middle Temple is possible, but might have been dangerous for him.  At some point in the next 3-1/2 years, Lord Keeper Lane seems to have joined Charles II in France.  When Charles II arrives back in Jersey on 17 September 1649, Lord Lane is specifically mentioned as being part of the group.  Continue reading “The Funeral Procession of Lord Keeper Lane, May 1650”

Welcome to the (very real) Quest to Find the “Lost Lord Keeper” of the 1600’s English Civil War

In the Spring of 2015, I was browsing the antique book stores in the antiques district of South Broadway in Denver, Colorado.  Gallagher’s Books is one of those fun bookshops that just knows what they are doing: interesting books for all tastes, but no room for junk. No matter where you look, you find titles that draw your eye…

I hadn’t really planned on buying anything. I was feeling social, and seeing cases filled with older books, I was curious how far back the inventory of retail antique book stores might go. I took a sip of coffee and playfully asked the proprietor, “What’s the oldest book you have?”  I was expecting something in the mid-1800s.  Very early 1800s, perhaps? I couldn’t recall – when was the printing press invented again?  Sue smiled gamely and replied, “Actually, I think I have one from the middle 1600s…”

Continue reading “Welcome to the (very real) Quest to Find the “Lost Lord Keeper” of the 1600’s English Civil War”