Breaking News! I Have Proven the True Identity of King Charles II’s Groom Named “Richard Lane”!

In the first article on the career of Richard Lane’s son, we led up to King Charles II’s invasion of England to restore his throne, and how his new Groom, Richard Lane (the younger), likely joined him in Scotland around the time of his coronation there in January 1651.  Of course, the throne the young king really had his eye on was that of England.  And the Scottish army now under his command was his means to that end…

Continue reading “Breaking News! I Have Proven the True Identity of King Charles II’s Groom Named “Richard Lane”!”

Passing of the Torch: The Service of Richard Lane the Younger to the King

My research into Richard Lane’s son has been far more successful than I dared hope.  What was to have been one article has become four, revealing a fascinating story of survival, drama and ultimate vindication of his exiled father, Sir Richard Lane. Continue reading “Passing of the Torch: The Service of Richard Lane the Younger to the King”

Kudos to the Magic of the Interlibrary Loan Program!

I really wanted to understand more about the 1600s Jersey diarist, Jean Chevalier.  His journal (a legacy gift to his own familial descendants) has become an unmatched window into his times.  It is also the crown jewel of the Société Jersiaise, and the only credible historical document to tell of Sir Richard Lane’s fate while in exile with King Charles II during the English Civil War.  But who was Jean Chevalier? How credible were his observations?  I finally found a book that promised to tell me…

Continue reading “Kudos to the Magic of the Interlibrary Loan Program!”

Update on the Trial of Strafford Painting

“Proving” is an ambitious word.  How do you “prove” that a mid-1800s painter depicting an important historical scene was aware of and attempting to portray specific actors and their inter-relationships in a drama that was already more than 200 years old at the moment he first stood before his empty canvas? Clearly, Thomas Woolnoth went to pains to realistically portray the principals of the scene in “The Trial of Strafford”, but was he aware of Richard Lane and his  role? How much research did he do? How can we assert that he would have been aware of historical research that was being done in his own time?  Without  corroborating evidence, such assertions must be considered a hypothesis – one based on raw speculation…but, I think we can do better! Continue reading “Update on the Trial of Strafford Painting”

A discovery! The UK Parliament’s circa 1844 painting “The Trial of Strafford”…

The grounds of history around Sir Richard Lane are simply full of rabbit holes!  While doing some research into the 1641 Trial of the Earl of Strafford – an event that included the day the historical biographer Lord John Campbell called “the most memorable day in the life of Richard Lane” – I came across a wonderful painting of that trial in the UK parliament’s art collection. What makes it so wonderful is that the painter had endeavored to accurately portray all of the primary actors in the drama of that trial…

Continue reading “A discovery! The UK Parliament’s circa 1844 painting “The Trial of Strafford”…”

Why am I pursuing this Quest?

“Considering Sir Richard Lane’s spotless integrity, and his uniform adherence to his principles, – notwithstanding his comparative obscurity and his poverty, he is more to be honoured than many of his predecessors  and successors who have left behind them a brilliant reputation, and ample possessions and high dignities to their posterity”   — Lord John Campbell (1848 “Lives of the Lord Chancellors”, Vol 2)

Why is this quest so important to you? This is a question I have been asked quite often – and given the investment of time, energy and some money it has taken, it’s a fair question!

In the beginning, it was simple curiosity.  I bought the “Lane’s Reports” book because it was so fascinatingly old.  I wanted to find out what else there might be to know about it, beyond its age and the quill margin notes it contained. What could it tell me about the world it came from?  Whose hands had held it long before even the earliest family I have known even existed? Or, for that matter, before most of this country existed?

Continue reading “Why am I pursuing this Quest?”

Summary Report of Jersey Visit (Part I)

I have found no evidence that Richard Lane visited Jersey before he arrived there with Charles II and his “entourage in exile” on September 17, 1649.  Richard Lane could not have been part of Charles II’s entourage during his first visit to Jersey from April 17, 1646 – June 24, 1646.  At the time of that earlier visit, Charles I was still alive, and Richard Lane was in Oxford, negotiating with parliamentary forces for the surrender of the King’s forces there. Continue reading “Summary Report of Jersey Visit (Part I)”

Summary Report of our London Visit

I’m going to need a vacation to recover from my “vacation”!  Although it’s good to be to be back home in “the colonies”, I am deeply grateful for every moment of the last week in the UK.  Continue reading “Summary Report of our London Visit”

The Funeral Procession of Lord Keeper Lane, May 1650

In a strange and completely unplanned coincidence, I leave for my trip to London and Jersey on the 367th anniversary of Lord Lane’s death in Jersey….

 Lord Keeper Lane’s whereabouts following his negotiations for the surrender of King Charles I’s forces at Oxford in the Spring of 1646 are unclear.  But, Lord Keeper Lane could not have been part of the entourage of Charles II when he first he arrived in Jersey for a two month stay in April 1646 – at that time, Lord Keeper Lane was still in Oxford.  Whether he returned to Middle Temple is possible, but might have been dangerous for him.  At some point in the next 3-1/2 years, Lord Keeper Lane seems to have joined Charles II in France.  When Charles II arrives back in Jersey on 17 September 1649, Lord Lane is specifically mentioned as being part of the group.  Continue reading “The Funeral Procession of Lord Keeper Lane, May 1650”